The Greasy Hands Preachers

It's kind of tricky with movies about motorcycles. Many gave it a try, most of them should have stayed away and only e few did a good job. Too often, the result's got too much of a penchant for any particular area of the subject, may this be racing or the freedom, friendship and fringes department. Most of us lose interest after an hour-long explanation of the perfect apex or the repeating images of motorcycle convoys in front of Mount Rushmore.

The recent glut of short movies on video platforms, often well-made but somehow pathetic, are gradually getting annoying too. A beard and a few sparks are not enough to make a good movie. Take a trip down memory lane to Bruce Brown and Steve McQueen's On Any Sunday, which was worth seeing although even that one served up some clichés. But it's got the vintage-bonus and watched with just the right amount of booze or similar mind-altering substances it could lead to a certain, well, let’s say...hipnotic experience.

(Picture taken from the Greasy Hands Preachers movie)

(Picture taken from the Greasy Hands Preachers movie)

Now, two french filmmakers going by the name of Clément Beauvais and Arthur de Kersauson thought it would be a great idea to make a motorcycle movie that depicts the new alt-Custom scene. They started a kickstarter campaign to fund the project and due to huge success motorcycle-, clothing- as well as lubricant producers soon knocked on their door. Even some bloke named Orlando Bloom from an L.A.-suburb called Hollywood jumped aboard. The result is a 92-minute Super 16 movie that gives quite a good impression on today's custom motorcycle scene.

(Picture taken from the Greasy Hands Preachers movie)

(Picture taken from the Greasy Hands Preachers movie)

They filmed at the Saltflats in Utah, in Indonesia, Spain, France and Scotland while putting, among others, people like Shinya Kimura, El Solitario, Blitz Motorcycles, Roland Sands or the Deus guys into the limelight. And that's the secret recipe of the soup: by letting all those people, various as they are, explain their idea on the motorcycle and how they came to customize them, the message of the documentary slowly takes shape; even if Shinya Kimura comes to bikes from his early admiration of insects and anime figures, Roland Sands' past in racing influences every single build he realizes today or the guys from Deus who manage to combine two seemingly unrelated worlds like surfing and motorcycling it becomes clear that in the end we are all in love with the same thing. Riding motorcycles.

(Picture taken from the Greasy Hands Preachers movie)

(Picture taken from the Greasy Hands Preachers movie)

Some of us might not understand certain views or builds by the more eclectic builders like El Solitario but The Greasy Hands Preachers hopefully opens some people’s minds and proves that every new custom bike, whatever style it has and whoever build the thing, is an enrichment for the custom scene. Every one of us, remembering the years of dull plain black, matt black, or silk-matt fat-rear-tire things should be thankful that they have mostly given way to a parade of brands, styles and color. Because if you really love motorcycles, you love every motorcycle and not only your brand or your favorite style (type your exceptions here................, everyone's entitled to one or two)

(Picture taken from the Greasy Hands Preachers movie)

(Picture taken from the Greasy Hands Preachers movie)

The Greasy Hands Preachers is definitely worth one and a half hours of your time. You can buy or rent it at the well-known providers or, if you want to hold it in your hands, get it at the big online retailers or Louis.eu

Greasy Hands Preachers

(Picture taken from the Greasy Hands Preachers movie)

ghp8-friends

(Picture taken from the Greasy Hands Preachers movie)

ghp8-forestw&w

(Picture taken from the Greasy Hands Preachers movie)